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Author Topic: The Demise of Traditional Media  (Read 11526 times)

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Mongrel

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #80 on: May 11, 2009, 02:55:20 AM »

No, but so long as we won't disqualify the efforts of the amateurs.

I wasn't.

IM, were you?

I'm all for citizen journalism.  It's just that it's not likely to get you a ticket to Basra.

Nope, I wasn't either. You pretty much just rephrased all my arguments from earlier, only, y'know, in a more coherent way.
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Mongrel

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #81 on: May 19, 2009, 06:05:45 PM »

An insider's view of the Washington Journalism machine after 40 years.

It's a bit blustery and the fellow has his own axe to grind, but he plays it mostly straight. Interesting to read about the work done by non-profits, as well as several other points.
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SCD

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #82 on: May 20, 2009, 12:12:14 AM »

Two things:

1)  As always, the Economist delivers a valid, if possibly not accurate viewpoint

2)  In Canuckistan, the privately owned television giant CTV is in desperation campaign mode

If CTV loses its local, I won't notice.  What worries me is that for most local stuff -  I usually read the Times Colonist, which is a part of the Canwest Global media corporation.  They're hit bad, and now require to drop the Monday edition - It pains me to think when they lose another day, and maybe another... to the point where they're either a weekly or dead.

There are the freebies like the "Victoria News" and "Monday Magazine", but both have either too many ads, or an approaching-extremist left angle that leaves me away from their editorials. 

As my world requires me to move to Ottawa in eight days, I will not notice the change, but I will say that it is starting to move fast and hard in Canada.  Between this and a <50% turnout rate for a recent election, I almost get the feeling that we may live to see a social/cultural revolution from a distance.  The winter olympics might serve as a catalyst. 

Sucks to be Fredward.
 
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Ted Belmont

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Cthulhu-chan

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #84 on: July 23, 2009, 09:14:06 PM »

It's funny (in a sad way) that in this day and age only a comedy show would have the gall to report honestly.
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Detonator

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #85 on: July 23, 2009, 09:35:24 PM »

As much as I would like to parade this around... it's an online poll.  Remember the other Time online poll where it was decided that moot was the most influential human being alive?
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Alex

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #86 on: July 24, 2009, 01:20:51 AM »

And denied Mick Foley his rightful place as the most influential Dude Love in the world?
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Pacobird

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #87 on: July 24, 2009, 07:06:39 AM »

Decrying the profit-driven nature of American news media is seeign the forest for the trees in a Real and Serious Way.
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Detonator

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #88 on: July 24, 2009, 08:26:47 AM »

What does that even mean
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Brentai

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #89 on: July 24, 2009, 08:32:43 AM »

I think it means
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SCD

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #90 on: July 24, 2009, 12:45:04 PM »

I watched CNN the other day. 

If I was on a show, I would prefer to go on the daily than any other real media station in the states, safe for NPR. 

I have seen him debate with everyone from the right winger politicians with a strong respect for the oposing position that allows the other side to get the message across.  Many other people do not let this happen. 

Jon stewart also does a fantastic job of bringing other people around from Musharif, the present ambassador to pakistan, Liberia's current pres, and many a other diplomat or bureaucrat in a fashion unheard of. 

He's almost like our rick mercer up north, except rick mercer really only wants to be light hearted and to show the human side of people he usually mocks.  I still remember the episode where he met our former prime minister in our version of the whitehouse, 24 sussex drive  only to find the porch wasn't weather-sealed.  He went with the PM to Canadian Tire - a department store to purchase the sealing, then they both did it on national television. 

Jon Stewart shows both those sides, and this is why he gets respect from all sides (except for those in the conservative media). 

On another note in Canada's media problems, three local news stations in victoria, prince george, and red deer under the global banner went dead....

There goes the local stations..
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sei

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #91 on: July 24, 2009, 01:38:01 PM »

Jon Stewart shows both those sides, and this is why he gets respect from all sides (except for those in the conservative media and many of those consuming it).
fixt
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Mothra

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #92 on: January 26, 2010, 11:07:48 PM »

This is unreal.

After going pay-only three months back in November - to either $5 a month or $260 a year - Newsday has accumulated only 35 subscribers.

35.

Quote
That astoundingly low figure was revealed in a newsroom-wide meeting last week by publisher Terry Jimenez when a reporter asked how many people had signed up for the site. Mr. Jimenez didn't know the number off the top of his head, so he asked a deputy sitting near him. He replied 35.

Michael Amon, a social services reporter, asked for clarification.

"I heard you say 35 people," he said, from Newsday's auditorium in Melville. "Is that number correct?"

Mr. Jimenez nodded.

Quote
The web site redesign and relaunch cost the Dolans $4 million, according to Mr. Jimenez. With those 35 people, they've grossed about $9,000.

 :nyoro~n:
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Joxam

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #93 on: January 27, 2010, 12:44:59 AM »

Quote
Mr. Jimenez was in no mood to apologize. "That's 35 more than I would have thought it would have been," said Mr. Jimenez to the assembled staff, according to five interviews with Newsday staffers.

ha
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Mongrel

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #94 on: January 27, 2010, 04:05:17 AM »

Yeah, I've heard about that NYT drive for newspaper sites to go back to hiding behind pay walls. There are a few unavoidable problems there:

1) It will only work if everyone does it. Okay, this MIGHT happen in the long run. MAYBE.
2) It reduces casual traffic generated by one person linking stories to a non-subscriber (you must be a subscriber to read this story...).
3) all it takes is one subscriber copying and pasting an important news story and there you go. Is it illegal? Sure! Is that gonna stop people? Hahaha!
4) Many cities in North America now have actual print newspapers distributed for free. Sure all they do is reprint stories put together by better papers (or else they're obviously published by a special interest group), but they demonstrate where things are going.
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SCD

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #95 on: January 27, 2010, 07:27:23 AM »

Your point #4 is invalid in terms of journalistic integrety.  You're not the only city with the metro and 24.  Pure rubbish that fails to keep readers informed about the real issues that surround them and generally have a bias so strong to the left that it would make Constantine gag.  I still haven't forgiven the metro for publishing the page long critique of the repeal of the long arms registry, yet refused to publish any letters (including my own) that quote hard statistics on why the system failed apart.  They chose touchy feely over facts, not unlike the IPCC.


Otherwise, 

Edit for devils advocate:  How much money are they getting from the cable companies for the access?  How long are they locked in for?  It will hurt the paper in the longterm, but perhaps the mgmt saw its demise coming and that as the root that it could grab as it fell down the cliff.
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BŁge

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #96 on: January 27, 2010, 07:51:52 AM »

Can you really call metro a newspaper? It's really just something you read while waiting to transfer buses.

4) Many cities in North America now have actual print newspapers distributed for free. Sure all they do is reprint stories put together by better papers (or else they're obviously published by a special interest group), but they demonstrate where things are going.

That's not entirely true. My city has a free newspaper, Pulse, that... well, actually, you can see for yourself: http://www.pulseniagara.com/

It's a very local grassroots, indie style paper. As such, it does have a liberal bent to it.
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Mongrel

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #97 on: January 27, 2010, 08:22:17 AM »

Your point #4 is invalid in terms of journalistic integrety.  You're not the only city with the metro and 24.  Pure rubbish that fails to keep readers informed about the real issues that surround them and generally have a bias so strong to the left that it would make Constantine gag.  I still haven't forgiven the metro for publishing the page long critique of the repeal of the long arms registry, yet refused to publish any letters (including my own) that quote hard statistics on why the system failed apart.  They chose touchy feely over facts, not unlike the IPCC.


Otherwise, 

Edit for devils advocate:  How much money are they getting from the cable companies for the access?  How long are they locked in for?  It will hurt the paper in the longterm, but perhaps the mgmt saw its demise coming and that as the root that it could grab as it fell down the cliff.

You may not have noticed yet, but Metro actually just reprints most of their articles verbatim from the Toronto Star (so in that case "better newpapers" is a very relative term, LOL), which was the main gist of my point.

It's a worthless leech of a paper, but they're the ones with an increasing circulation. Which is all that matters for this argument: The free stuff is circulating and the pay stuff is declining.
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Pacobird

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #98 on: January 27, 2010, 08:25:54 AM »

I am still not seeing how people are supposed to make a living in this brave new world of news media where nobody ever pays for anything.  I mean, I know some people find the idea of paying for the services of the Fourth Branch a little distasteful but the less financially rewarding and cutthroat journalism is, the more we will have to endure semi-literate 20-something hacks writing Wikipedia-researched fluff pieces about viagra because they are the only people dumb enough to take their college degrees and happily march right into careers that pay 25 grand a year with no benefits and even less stability.
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Zaratustra

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Re: The Demise of Traditional Media
« Reply #99 on: January 27, 2010, 10:19:33 AM »

and the chinese
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