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Author Topic: Online Privacy  (Read 4982 times)

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Smiler

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Brentai

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #41 on: April 28, 2012, 10:17:52 AM »

Read: CISPA would allow the DoJ to use confidential information against them the next time they get sued for something.

Which, well, applies to basically every company, really.  It'd be hilarious if this thing passed and it immediately unearthed a ton of shit about Big Oil or something, but it's still not worth finally instituting a real full Big Brother policy.
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Thad

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #42 on: June 07, 2012, 08:29:30 AM »

So the proposed standard for the cookie "Do Not Track" list actually...mandates that it be opt-in on the user's side.

IE10 was going to have the do-not-track function turned on by default; now it's not going to because that would be a standards violation.

So, uh, we now live in a topsy-turvy world where MS has been forced to comply with Web standards and I believe that to be a BAD thing.
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Classic

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #43 on: June 07, 2012, 08:54:10 AM »

Because of the nature of participation in opt-in vs. opt-out programs, this is probably the only way to keep ad-based services on the net viable.

The mouse already has a giant fucking glass of milk and, apparently, a gun.
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Thad

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #44 on: June 07, 2012, 09:54:04 AM »

Because of the nature of participation in opt-in vs. opt-out programs, this is probably the only way to keep ad-based services on the net viable.

Well, bullshit.  Google can go back to serving ads that are directly pertinent to the specific search you are looking at or the specific site you are on, Facebook can limit its data mining to things you have actually deliberately clicked the "Like" button on, and Amazon can continue to look exclusively at items you have purchased through Amazon.

Any motherfucker tells me his business will fail if he can't continue to spy on every website his users visit and every E-Mail they send DESERVES for his business to fail.
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Brentai

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #45 on: June 07, 2012, 11:48:44 AM »

The internet grew pretty well in the decade or so before people even started mining that data.

But yeah, can't really fault a company for using information they already have.  There really needs to be a more stringent rule that webmasters need to be able to justify every single element of data they collect with something other than marketing, though.
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Classic

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #46 on: June 07, 2012, 12:20:02 PM »

What do you suppose is going to happen when clients are told that the kind of targeting they've come to expect is going to become basically nonexistent?
The mouse already has a giant fucking glass of milk and, apparently, a gun.
I don't know how many web services could survive whatever financial bullying the big ad clients are going to try to use to keep those privacy invading features they believe are helpful.

Don't get me wrong. I don't think this tracking and extra mining is actually useful or good for anyone. Also this is a genie that can be put back in its bottle, but it's going to demand a tithe in blood. I don't want a policy that's meant to make the internet more free actually make it less free.
Though, you're right. With crowdfunding more and more in the public sphere, now's probably one of the best times to try and go for it.
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Thad

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #47 on: June 07, 2012, 12:50:25 PM »

What do you suppose is going to happen when clients are told that the kind of targeting they've come to expect is going to become basically nonexistent?

Oh, they're gonna lobby like motherfuckers.

But that's not my point.  Hell, the TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY of the DNT list is limited pretty much exclusively to large companies operating in the US, and even then the Justice Department's track record of actually stopping major computer companies from doing flagrantly illegal things is spotty at best.

My point is that the corporations whining that they can't exist unless they monitor my E-Mails are full of shit.
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Thad

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #48 on: June 26, 2012, 08:01:04 AM »

Sonic.net deletes logs after 2 weeks, on the realization that no legitimate law enforcement agency has ever asked for logs older than that and only copyright trolls go on that kind of fishing expedition.

If you live in California, you might consider giving them your money.  Looks like it's DSL and you need an AT&T land line, so that part kinda sucks.
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Mongrel

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #50 on: June 26, 2012, 10:40:23 PM »

Let the rage commence!
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Thad

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #51 on: August 09, 2012, 10:53:37 AM »

Google ordered to pay $22.5M for that "let's ignore Safari users' privacy settings" business.

Not much money for Google, but it's still a good start.
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Niku

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #52 on: August 13, 2012, 05:11:26 AM »

Database for waiters and drivers to post about their lousy tipping customers .. where they post their home addresses and phone numbers.
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Thad

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #53 on: August 13, 2012, 06:39:41 AM »

Man, that is some 1995-ass Web design.

In fairness, it's POSSIBLE those addresses are for the restaurants; it says "Street Address or Restaurant".  And most entries do not have a street address.

On the one hand, I don't have a hell of a lot of sympathy for someone who writes "Get a real job" under "Tip" on a piece of paper that has his name on it.  If you actually actively insult your server, you're basically daring them to do something like this.  Doesn't justify it, but it shouldn't really be a surprise.

Short of that?  There are lots of reasons someone might leave a bad tip, many of which boil down to how this economy sucks.

As far as being an effective way of shaming somebody?

Well, either it was a one-time thing or it wasn't.  If it was a one-time thing, then telling the Internet about it is unnecessary and unfair.  If the person is a HABITUAL lousy tipper, then it's STILL unnecessary, because guess what, every restaurant that person goes to on a regular basis already knows.
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TA

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #54 on: August 13, 2012, 06:54:17 AM »

So, what's the possible goal here?  Harassment of "bad tippers"?  Deliberately fucking with their food if you recognize them?

Fuck a lot of this.
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Royal☭

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #55 on: August 13, 2012, 08:01:20 AM »

Nice little manifestation of America's class war.

Brentai

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #56 on: August 13, 2012, 08:38:43 AM »

If you assume the customer is always in a higher social class than the servicer, anyway.  I see it as more of a continuation of the breakdown of mutual respect.
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Classic

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #57 on: August 13, 2012, 08:58:47 AM »

I see it as a continuation of the breakdown of mutual respect.

Well, yes, but it's based on this assumption:

Assume the customer is always in a higher social class than the servicer.

It's pretty ubiquitous.
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Royal☭

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #58 on: August 13, 2012, 09:18:42 AM »

That's not my assumption. My assumption is that the tipper and the server are both either middle or lower class. The class war I referred to is the act of pitting customer and server against each other via the tipping system, rather than just paying servers a living wage.

Thad

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Re: Online Privacy
« Reply #59 on: August 16, 2012, 10:07:37 AM »

Ars: Over 3 years later, "deleted" Facebook photos are still online

Now, it is, of course, good to remember that once you upload a photo, deleting it doesn't prevent the people who have already downloaded it from continuing to propagate it.

But in this case, it would appear that deleting it doesn't even actually delete it.

Ars: Three years later, deleting your photos on Facebook now actually works
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